Red String 0.75" Hamsa charm with Heart Adjustable Bracelet

Regular price $5.00 Sale

The red string bracelet is most commonly associated with Kabbalah, however, this practice is an ancient one in religions such as Buddhism, Hinduism, and Christianity. The reasons are shrouded in mythological mist in many countries, yet the reasons are quite similar, and represents the desire to ward off negative energies. Red has been a color used throughout history and is a symbol of blood, of protection. It has had a long standing tradition in human history for many different occasions. It is defined more so by attachments that culture puts on them. In ancient times, the color red was painted on front doors and animals as a form of protection against the evil eye (a gaze or stare that is superstitiously believed to cause material harm). Ancient warriors used to paint their weapon in red for the same reason before entering battle.

The Hamsa is an ancient Middle Eastern amulet symbolizing the Hand of God. In all faiths it is a protective sign. It brings it's owner happiness, luck, health, and good fortune.

The hamsa hand is known by many names - hamsa, hamsa hand, hamesh, hamesh hand, khamsa, and chamsa. It is also called the Hand of Miriam, named for Moses and Aaron's sister. There are two main styles of a hamsa hand: the most popular is the stylized hamsa hand with two symmetrical thumbs, but there are also hamsa hands that are not symmetrical and shaped like actual hands.

Either hamsa hand can be worn with the fingers pointing up or down, and both are believed to offer its owner happiness, peace, and prosperity, as well as protection from the ayin ha'ra, or the evil eye. The renewed interest in Kabbalah and mystical Judaism has brought the hamsa pendant back into vogue, and many artists are using the image of the hamsa hand in various aspects of their art including hamsa jewelry, paintings, sculptures, wall hamsas, and amulets.

The wearer of the hamsa hand can wear it facing up or down and is thought to give the owner success, harmony, and also protection from the ayin ha’ra, also know as the evil eye.  Today, with the rising popularity of Kabbalah and spiritual Judaism, the hamsa hand has become increasingly more widespread. It is also commonly found in a wide variety of varying aspects of art.